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Traditional routing protocols and SDN

asked 2014-11-04 06:09:21 -0700

brandta gravatar image

updated 2014-11-04 06:13:30 -0700

Hi, Can anyone tell me how does traditional routing protocols fit into SDN. If a traditional router, say Cisco router is Openflow enabled (through update), does it then just function as a switch waiting for table entries from the controller.

How does the controller become aware of path or node failures.

Thanks Angus

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It would depend on the default action that is set on the switch. For an unknown packet, it will seek the controller for the action to be taken.

Srijit Nair ( 2014-12-11 22:57:49 -0700 )edit

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answered 2015-01-08 14:22:07 -0700

If a traditional router, say Cisco router is Openflow enabled (through update), does it then just function as a switch waiting for table entries from the controller.

Yep, pretty much. If a packet comes to the switch with a set of headers that don't match any already-programmed OpenFlow match condition, the switch sends a Packet-In message the controller with the unknown-how-to-route packet info. The controller does its work, then sends back a Flow-Mod message, which contains a match condition and an action. The switch can use that action to route the packet in question, as well as any future packets that match the given match condition (so it doesn't have to punt to the controller as much).

How does the controller become aware of path or node failures.

This is handled by various SDN controllers differently. ODL has a number of projects that collect different types of topo data, then report to Topology Manager.

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Asked: 2014-11-04 06:09:21 -0700

Seen: 393 times

Last updated: Jan 08 '15